Can't Stop the Movies - No One Can Stop The Movies
Can't Stop the Movies
19Jul/180

Changing Reels Season 2 Episode 12 – The Virgin Suicides (1999)

We dive back into the films of Sofia Coppola with The Virgin Suicides and discuss our short film pick of the week Hala by Minhal Baig.

Show notes:

If you like what you hear, or want to offer some constructive criticism, please take a moment to rate our show on iTunes or Google Play! If you have a comment on this episode, or want to suggest a film for us to discuss, feel free to contact us via twitter (@ChangingReelsAC), follow us on Facebook and reach out to us by email (Changing.Reels.AC@gmail.com). You can also hear our show on SoundCloud or Stitcher!

Filed under: 1990's, Podcasts No Comments
18Jul/180

How It Ends (2018)

Enjoy the piece? Please share this article on your platform of choice using the buttons above, or join the Twitch stream here!

Disaster strikes on the west coast and is felt throughout the United States.  Will and Tom must put aside their hostility for one another to traverse the American landscape to save Will's girlfriend, and Tom's daughter, Sam.  David M. Rosenthal directs How It Ends from the screenplay written by Brooks McLaren which stars Theo James and Forest Whitaker.

After I finished watching How It Ends, I went searching for the poster and - once discovered - let out a big laugh.  The poster shows Will (Theo James) looking like an action hero with a bit of flare from the sun in the foreground and a transparent Tom (Forest Whitaker) looking somber in the background.  Its visual message is muddled and even after finishing How It Ends I have to wonder what the poster's creators were trying to communicate.  Is Tom an evil haunting Will, the man overseeing Will, some compatriot, or the one Will is trying to rescue?

Brook McLaren's screenplay answers, "All of the above," and David M. Rosenthal's direction responds, "Why not?"

Thus, How It Ends comes into existence with little clue about its identity as it strives to be multiple films at once and not succeeding at a blessed one of them.  Some of that has to do with how thinly stretched the apocalyptic content is if you have the barest knowledge of American weather patterns.  More of that has to do with James' lead performance that isn't exciting enough to call bland.  Then there's Whitaker, a professional and master of his field no matter where he shows up, throwing himself full speed into whatever emotional tone is required of him at the moment.

17Jul/180

Ni No Kuni 2: Revenant Kingdom (2018)

Enjoy the piece? Please share this article on your platform of choice using the buttons above, or join the Twitch stream here!

If this is your first time reading Pixels in Praxis or are averse to spoilers, check out our FAQ before proceeding.

There are exactly two moments in Ni No Kuni 2: Revenant Kingdom (just Revenant Kingdom moving forward) that I felt a bit of magic moving through me.  The first was when the deposed Prince Evan and new bodyguard / advisor / interdimensional time traveling President Roland (more on that in a moment) escaped Ding Dong Dell to enter the world at large.  Tiny chibi representations of the two and Evan's adorable jump animation were so precious I uttered, "That's darling," to myself.  The second occurred in Goldpaw - a gambling-based kingdom run by a dog - that enchants an annoying bird to follow around people who owe the kingdom money screeching, "U O ME U O ME".

Latter bit there might be an annoyance to some players, but it was the right amount of silly to make me think there would be some surprises in Revenant Kingdom.  I was wrong. Okay, not entirely wrong as the airship Freud would have had quite the time analyzing makes for a jarring midgame sight.  But that's not magical, or much fun, it's just a bit of grotesquerie that broke up the otherwise clean artistry of Revenant Kingdom that rarely challenged my skills or sparked my imagination.

10Jul/180

Detention (2017)

Enjoy the piece? Please share this article on your platform of choice using the buttons above, or join the Twitch stream here!

If this is your first time reading Pixels in Praxis or are averse to spoilers, check out our FAQ before proceeding.

Detention defines itself through absence and horrific spectacle.  The former weighs on the latter after Wei Chung Ting disappears searching for a phone to call for help.  The latter makes its presence felt as soon as Wei goes missing with Fang Ray Shin waking up in a nightmare version of her auditorium with Wei's corpse hanging upside-down above her.  There is no way this story can end well, at least in the way we're accustomed to with survival and acceptance.  The only way Detention can end is through repetition or resignation, repeating the horrific spectacle or wearily letting go of the time lost.

Playing Detention is a sometimes exhausting experience but - save for one break I needed to get some outside air - it's one I willingly took on myself from start-to-finish.  The only other game I felt compelled to do this with in recent memory is Night in the Woods.  The parallels aren't immediately apparent, yet they're pressing.  Both have to do with the ways struggling communities under the weight of some oppressive regime expect their young (women, in particular) to sacrifice themselves for temporary relief.  There are even matching scenes where the depressed protagonists stare at themselves in the mirror and are saddened or disgusted by the person peering back.

5Jul/180

Changing Reels Season 2 Episode 11 – Eve’s Bayou (1997)

Hailed by Roger Ebert as the best film of 1997, Eve’s Bayou is an astonishing work. We dive into Kasi Lemmons’ directorial debut and discuss the theme of memory, the lies adults tell children, and so much more. We also spend time with our short film pick 1982 by Jeremy Breslau.

Show notes:

  • 1:09 – 1982 by Jeremy Breslau.
  • 7:47 – Eve’s Bayou by Kasi Lemmons

If you like what you hear, or want to offer some constructive criticism, please take a moment to rate our show on iTunes or Google Play! If you have a comment on this episode, or want to suggest a film for us to discuss, feel free to contact us via twitter (@ChangingReelsAC), follow us on Facebook and reach out to us by email (Changing.Reels.AC@gmail.com). You can also hear our show on SoundCloud or Stitcher!

Filed under: DVD Reviews No Comments