The Decalogue Archives - Can't Stop the Movies
Can't Stop the Movies
13Jul/100

Decalogue: Ten (1988)

My examination of The Decalogue is a full analysis of each film, its themes and visual strategy.  If you have not seen The Decalogue, I would highly advise stopping here and watching it before continuing.

"Thou shalt not covet thy neighbors goods."

Andrew COMMENTARYWith the final Decalogue film Kieslowski decided to roll back the tension a bit.  Infidelity?  Not a focus here.  Murder?  Not a chance.  Instead of making an incredibly bleak family drama or portrait of despairing love, he just decides to make black comedy playing on human’s natural level of greed.

5Jul/100

Decalogue: Nine (1988)

My examination of The Decalogue is a full analysis of each film, its themes and visual strategy.  If you have not seen The Decalogue, I would highly advise stopping here and watching it before continuing.

"Thou shalt not covet thy neighbors wife."

Andrew COMMENTARYWatching Decalogue: Nine and trying to detach it from the rest of Kieslowski’s work is very difficult.  It lays a lot of framework for his later Double Life of Veronique and distracts me away from it’s own quality.  Still, judged as a work within the series of Decalogue films it covers a lot of ground that has been previously treaded, just in a way that almost seems designed to trick you into thinking it’s fresh.

30Jun/100

Decalogue: Eight (1988)

My examination of The Decalogue is a full analysis of each film, its themes and visual strategy.  If you have not seen The Decalogue, I would highly advise stopping here and watching it before continuing.

"Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor."

Andrew COMMENTARYAs we wind down the collection of Commandment based movies, Kieslowski decides it's time for something of a manifesto.  A declaration, very simple, of why he is doing these films and what they are supposed to represent.  It's a bit odd that it's contained in Eight, which has some intriguing elements, but ultimately falters under it's own sense of metacommentary.  This is a series that has thrived on subtlety and cunning, so when we have a story that's so completely spelled out it's a bit jarring.

29Jun/100

Decalogue: Seven (1988)

My examination of The Decalogue is a full analysis of each film, its themes and visual strategy.  If you have not seen The Decalogue, I would highly advise stopping here and watching it before continuing.

"Thou shalt not steal."

Andrew COMMENTARYDavid Mamet, commenting on the role of most women in movies, said "Even the dramatic roles for women, when viewed not as entertainment but as, if I may, art are drivel...treating us to the noble spectacle of women either crying or bravely not crying." Depth, intelligence, wit these are all qualities eschewed in favor of giving the audience a good sentimental jolt.  Kieslowski films strive to provide female characters a powerful voice.  Decalogue: Seven is an excellent example of this.

14Jun/100

Decalogue: Six (1988)

My examination of The Decalogue is a full analysis of each film, its themes and visual strategy.  If you have not seen The Decalogue, I would highly advise stopping here and watching it before continuing.

"Thou shalt not commit adultery."

Andrew COMMENTARYIf there’s one thing that The Decalogue does better than anything else it’s questioning the very system morality is based on.  We all like to feel good about ourselves, and moral systems give us the tools and means to feel superior to someone.  Granted, this runs contrary to the very idea of morality in a certain sense.  It’s all supposed to be used as a tool for the betterment of all instead of the gratification of a few select people.  That doesn’t change the fact that it is a fluid and subjective system that shifts what is right and wrong depending on the situation.