Can't Stop the Movies - Page 2 of 375 - No One Can Stop The Movies
Can't Stop the Movies
17Apr/170

For the week of 4/18/2017 on Can’t Stop the Movies

After last week's foray into animation, I'm going to be switching back to live action and looking at some of the major dramas I missed from 2016.  We kick off the week with the faith-based horror of Silence, Dev Patel's multi-award recognized work in Lion, Park Chan-wook's atmospheric The Handmaiden, and a dose of Adam Driver with Paterson.

Courtney and I will also be dropping episode 17 of Changing Reels over at Modern Superior.  We'll be discussing the 2016 Korean horror film The Wailing.

Remember, no one can stop the movies.

16Apr/170

Changing Reels Episode 16 – Memories of Murder

Two vastly different cops are tasked with trying to solve Korea’s first serial murder case ever in Bong Joon-ho’s 2003 film Memories of Murder.  A visually captivating crime drama that festers in one’s mind, the film’s blend of mystery and dark comedy will keep you on the edge of your seats.   In discussing the film, we touch themes including the deconstruction of law enforcing and media institutions, gender perceptions and why dropkicks are the new “hello.”  We also take a few minutes to highlight our short film selections:  Doyeon Noh’s Human Form and The Halsall Brothers’ If I Had a Heart.

Show Notes:

If you like what you hear, or want to offer some constructive criticism, please take a moment to rate our show on iTunes!  If you have a comment on this episode, or want to suggest a film for us to discuss, feel free to contact us via twitter (@ChangingReelsAC), follow us on Facebook and reach out to us by email (Changing.Reels.AC@gmail.com).  You can also hear our show on SoundCloud or Stitcher!

Filed under: 2000's, Podcasts No Comments
15Apr/170

Changing Reels Episode 15 – Timecrimes

A man accidentally gets into a time machine and travels back in time….and that is the least of his problems.  In this episode, we discuss Nacho Vigalondo’s brilliantly constructed science fiction tale Timecrimes.  Part thriller and part dark comedy, Vigalondo ensures that no moment is wasted in this film. While other time travel tales get bogged down with explaining how the machine itself works, Timecrimes’ brisk pace and frequent twists ensure that audiences will be coming back multiple times.   We also take a few minutes to discuss our short film selections:  Joe Kramer’s Running the Gammatar and J. Searle Dowley’s Frankenstein.

Show Notes:

  • 6:22 – Running the Grammatar by Joe Kramer
  • 16:56 – Frankenstein by J. Searle Dowley
  • 25:12 – Timecrimes by Nacho Vigalondo

If you like what you hear, or want to offer some constructive criticism, please take a moment to rate our show on iTunes!  If you have a comment on this episode, or want to suggest a film for us to discuss, feel free to contact us via twitter (@ChangingReelsAC), follow us on Facebook and reach out to us by email (Changing.Reels.AC@gmail.com).  You can also hear our show on SoundCloud or Stitcher!

 

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14Apr/170

Moana (2016)

Moana, strong daughter of her village's chief, prepares to ascend to her father's position while fighting the urge to journey beyond the shoreline.  When the once plentiful resources of her village begin to dry up, Moana begins a journey which will make her a savior or crush her spirit.  Ron Clements and John Musker direct Moana, with the screenplay written by Jared Bush, and stars Auli'i Cravalho and Dwayne Johnson.

I love Moana (Auli'i Cravalho).  Moana is a good flick, but Moana is stronger than the typical Disney musical trappings surrounding her.  She's in-line to assume the position of Chief when her father is ready to move on, sits in rapt attention as a child at her grandmother Tala's (Rachel House) monstrous stories, and refuses to take guff from anyone.  When Moana is great, it's because of those moments where Moana is asserting her power and directors Ron Clements and John Musker follow suit, showcasing the diverse joy of her Polynesian life.

When Moana isn't so great, it's because Clements and Musker slide back into traditional Disney trappings.  I'm thinking of the songs about a community in love with itself, inexplicably in English, or the wheel-spinning of a woman tied down to her island when all she wants to do is get out there and explore.  The development of the, "We've gotta get out of this place," Disney heroine is a relatively recent invention with Ariel and Belle leading the way to Rapunzel and Elsa.  The three decades or so of their storylines have left the opening scenes of Moana feeling a bit stale in contrast to the gorgeously unique surroundings.

13Apr/170

Changing Reels Episode 14 – Upstream Color

In episode 14 of Changing Reels, we dive into Shane Carruth’s experimental science fiction drama Upstream Color. The film is a love story revolving around two individuals who find themselves inexplicably drawn together after being the victim of an unthinkable crime. Exploring themes of memory and identity, and featuring brilliant sound design, there is plenty to discuss in this film. As is custom, we also take a few minutes to highlight our two short film picks of the week: Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi’s Giant God Warrior Appears in Tokyo and Alberto Roldán’s Everything & Everything & Everything.

Show Notes:

  • 5:22 – Giant God Warrior Appears In Tokyo by Shinji Higuchi
  • 15:43 – Everything and Everything and Everything by Alberto Roldán
  • 26:09 – Upstream Color by Shane Carruth

If you like what you hear, or want to offer some constructive criticism, please take a moment to rate our show on iTunes! If you have a comment on this episode, or want to suggest a film for us to discuss, feel free to contact us via twitter (@ChangingReelsAC), follow us on Facebook and reach out to us by email (Changing.Reels.AC@gmail.com). You can also hear our show on SoundCloud or Stitcher!

Filed under: 2013, Podcasts No Comments